Family histories and interwar black history

I am tracking this project closely as this is a related sphere to my research on the US and France that has yet to receive much attention.

Drawing over the Colour Line: Geographies of art and cosmopolitan politics in London, 1919 - 1939

As our recent blog post shows, our contact with Nyay Bhushan, the great grandson of Vasu Deva Sharma, has been a fantastic opportunity for us to find out about Sharma’s migratory history and learn more about Sharma’s experiences of life as a Royal College of Art student in interwar London. We’ve created a select list of students and artist’s models all based in London during the period we are researching. If you have any information, no matter how small, about any of these individuals or the artworks they created please feel free to contact us at equianocentre@ucl.ac.uk

Students from Africa and Asia at London-based art schools:

  • Egyptian student Aimee Nimr at Slade School of Fine Art School of Fine Art during 1919
  • Nigerian student Aina Onabolu at St. John’s Wood Art School during 1922
  • Indian student Meher Bomansha Dalal at the Slade School of Fine Art School of Fine Art…

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Author: Camara Dia Holloway

I am an art historian specializing in early twentieth century American art with particular focus on the history of photography, race and representation, and transatlantic modernist networks. I earned my PhD at Yale University in the History of Art Department. Besides my leadership role as the Founding Co-Director of the Association for Critical Race Art History (ACRAH), I am recognized for my expertise on African American Art, particularly African American Photography, and as a seasoned consultant for exhibitions, museum collections, and symposia/lectures planning.

2 thoughts on “Family histories and interwar black history”

  1. I am happy to share this info. I applied for a fellowship to get to the UK in the next year that unfortunately I did not get. I am very interested in the London axis of the transatlantic circuit of the black and white moderns. I hope to do more research of my own on blacks from the states who set up base in the UK and the Bright Young Things who went jazz-mad.

  2. Dear Camara,

    Thank you so much for reblogging this from Drawing Over the Colour Line. It is indeed a fascinating journey to research my great grand-father’s legacy at the Royal College of Art. Thanks again for spreading the word!

    Best wishes
    Nyay Bhushan

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